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[Solution] Culturally Diverse Recruitment

Please read the scenario and answer how you would solve Sharon’s challenges.  Sharon recently filled the new diversity manager position for a high tech company that she has worked for more than 10 years. The CEO asked her to take on the role because she had been a successful African American in the organization as a community relations officer. The goal was to help the organization attract the best and brightest in an increasingly culturally diverse recruitment pool. She quickly discovers that the new job requires competence beyond her expertise. Sharon attends a few diversity officer training and seminars to get comfortable in her role. She decides to implement three programs she learned in the training: an organizational climate assessment, organization-wide cultural diversity sensitivity training, and affinity groups. The CEO has a lot of trust in her abilities, so Sharon has the authority to move forward as long as she gives regular progress reports to the leadership team. An advisory group representing a cross-section of the organization was put together for support in disseminating information needed to move the projects along. She meets with them every three months for a couple of hours. About half the members show up. Sharon is unconcerned about the attendance numbers because she feels comfortable calling on each member when she needs her or his expert advice. Sharon solicits proposals to external consultants to perform the climate assessment, selects a vendor, and works closely with the consultants during data collection. The results show that the organization is in the Ambivalence stage (See the cultural competence-inclusion stage model). She received mixed feedback after presenting the results to the leadership team, but the CEO said he was very impressed with how much she had learned since taking on the new role. Sharon feels assured that she can move ahead. The next order of business was to solicit proposals for the full organization diversity training. While she waited on proposal submissions, Sharon started putting together the affinity groups. Things started to get more challenging when she realized that an affinity group for gay and lesbian employees may be needed. She quickly got the African American, Asian-Pacific Islander, and Latino groups formed, but even some members of these groups confided in her that they were uneasy with the organization supporting a gay and lesbian group. One of the most out-spoken lesbians made it clear to Sharon that she was expecting that a group would be formed for them. When the CEO learned about the matter, he “diplomatically” told Sharon that a gay-lesbian affinity group would not be a good idea. Sharon was in a dilemma and put little effort into moving forward with any of the affinity groups at that point. Once she started sorting through proposals from diversity training companies, she became concerned about the content. Where gay and lesbian are issues going to surface during the training? Will that create problems? Sharon scheduled an advisory committee meeting about the issues, which resulted in a heated discussion about the merits of diversity training. Suggestions, such as covering religious diversity, avoiding content about white privilege or racism, and avoiding role play games, led to considerable disagreement. In fact, a couple of members said that they felt uneasy staying on the advisory team. Then the human resource manager approached Sharon to express her concern about what her office has heard about the diversity initiative. Things started getting way out of hand when the corporate legal office got involved. They wanted the training to focus more on legal issues, such as civil rights and anti-harassment laws, instead of sensitivity training. Sensitivity training can “raise a lot of tension which may lead to grievances” is what she heard the lead attorney say. The legal office also expressed concern about the data that had been collected and wanted a meeting with the CEO and Sharon to determine how much of the data should be made public. Sharon starts to feel very overwhelmed at this point. She is uncertain how to move forward and is fearful that she will make a decision that could cause many problems for her and the organization. Quiz Questions Give a rationale for each. 1.What are the problems that Sharon needs to address to get the diversity program to move forward? 2.What are the examples of the symptoms of the problem she is facing? 3. What could she have done to better set the stage for discussions about diversity in the organization? 4.How should she handle the gay-lesbian affinity group challenge? 5.      What are three things Sharon can do to make progress? Each response should be at least 200-250 words. Prepare this assignment according to the APA Style guidelines. Provide an introduction and conclusion. This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion. Provide 3-5 peer-reviewed cited resources.

Please read the scenario and answer how you would solve Sharon’s challenges.  Sharon recently filled the new diversity manager position for a high tech company that she has worked for more than 10 years. The CEO asked her to take on the role because she had been a successful African American in the organization as a community relations officer. The goal was to help the organization attract the best and brightest in an increasingly culturally diverse recruitment pool. She quickly discovers that the new job requires competence beyond her expertise. Sharon attends a few diversity officer training and seminars to get comfortable in her role. She decides to implement three programs she learned in the training: an organizational climate assessment, organization-wide cultural diversity sensitivity training, and affinity groups. The CEO has a lot of trust in her abilities, so Sharon has the authority to move forward as long as she gives regular progress reports to the leadership team. An advisory group representing a cross-section of the organization was put together for support in disseminating information needed to move the projects along. She meets with them every three months for a couple of hours. About half the members show up. Sharon is unconcerned about the attendance numbers because she feels comfortable calling on each member when she needs her or his expert advice. Sharon solicits proposals to external consultants to perform the climate assessment, selects a vendor, and works closely with the consultants during data collection. The results show that the organization is in the Ambivalence stage (See the cultural competence-inclusion stage model). She received mixed feedback after presenting the results to the leadership team, but the CEO said he was very impressed with how much she had learned since taking on the new role. Sharon feels assured that she can move ahead. The next order of business was to solicit proposals for the full organization diversity training. While she waited on proposal submissions, Sharon started putting together the affinity groups. Things started to get more challenging when she realized that an affinity group for gay and lesbian employees may be needed. She quickly got the African American, Asian-Pacific Islander, and Latino groups formed, but even some members of these groups confided in her that they were uneasy with the organization supporting a gay and lesbian group. One of the most out-spoken lesbians made it clear to Sharon that she was expecting that a group would be formed for them. When the CEO learned about the matter, he “diplomatically” told Sharon that a gay-lesbian affinity group would not be a good idea. Sharon was in a dilemma and put little effort into moving forward with any of the affinity groups at that point. Once she started sorting through proposals from diversity training companies, she became concerned about the content. Where gay and lesbian are issues going to surface during the training? Will that create problems? Sharon scheduled an advisory committee meeting about the issues, which resulted in a heated discussion about the merits of diversity training. Suggestions, such as covering religious diversity, avoiding content about white privilege or racism, and avoiding role play games, led to considerable disagreement. In fact, a couple of members said that they felt uneasy staying on the advisory team. Then the human resource manager approached Sharon to express her concern about what her office has heard about the diversity initiative. Things started getting way out of hand when the corporate legal office got involved. They wanted the training to focus more on legal issues, such as civil rights and anti-harassment laws, instead of sensitivity training. Sensitivity training can “raise a lot of tension which may lead to grievances” is what she heard the lead attorney say. The legal office also expressed concern about the data that had been collected and wanted a meeting with the CEO and Sharon to determine how much of the data should be made public. Sharon starts to feel very overwhelmed at this point. She is uncertain how to move forward and is fearful that she will make a decision that could cause many problems for her and the organization. Quiz Questions Give a rationale for each. 1.What are the problems that Sharon needs to address to get the diversity program to move forward? 2.What are the examples of the symptoms of the problem she is facing? 3. What could she have done to better set the stage for discussions about diversity in the organization? 4.How should she handle the gay-lesbian affinity group challenge? 5.      What are three things Sharon can do to make progress? Each response should be at least 200-250 words. Prepare this assignment according to the APA Style guidelines. Provide an introduction and conclusion. This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion. Provide 3-5 peer-reviewed cited resources.

 

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